beyondfabric

beyondfabric:

Atelier de L’Armée AW13 Lookbook

Following my previous interview with Atelier de L’Armée founders Elza & Joost where I showed my love for their outstanding project, it has become a daily routine to browse their website looking for the latest bags, leather goods and vintage finds. Making use of this unique combination along with spot on styling and photography, here’s their latest lookbook… 

mumeditation

regibean:

When patients were committed to the Willard Asylum for the Insane in Upstate New York, they arrived with a suitcase packed with all of the possessions they thought they needed for their time inside.
Most never left. The mental hospital had an average stay of nearly 30 years. When patients died, they were buried in nameless graves across the street of the asylum. Their suitcases, with all their worldly possessions, were locked in an attic and forgotten.
In 1995, an employee of the mental hospital discovered the suitcases, 400 of them. They date from 1910 to 1960.
Now, photographer Jon Crispin is cataloging each suitcase and opening a window into the lives - and the minds - of the people deemed too unwell to be allowed in society.

Go here for more information and to sign up for notification on further development of the project
unconsumption
unconsumption:


A surfing sailor who sews bags from pre-consumer recycled materials and scraps from Coast Guard uniforms
Dry suit fabric and sailcloth are among mankind’s sturdiest manufactured materials, designed to hold up under some of the wildest conditions the ocean has to offer. So what happens to all the scraps that don’t end up in a Coast Guard airman’s kit, or stowed onboard a schooner? Luckily, some of it ends up in the hands of Portland-based designer Luke Mathers of Truce Designs.

More: Truce Designs - Cool Hunting

Boss.

unconsumption:

A surfing sailor who sews bags from pre-consumer recycled materials and scraps from Coast Guard uniforms

Dry suit fabric and sailcloth are among mankind’s sturdiest manufactured materials, designed to hold up under some of the wildest conditions the ocean has to offer. So what happens to all the scraps that don’t end up in a Coast Guard airman’s kit, or stowed onboard a schooner? Luckily, some of it ends up in the hands of Portland-based designer Luke Mathers of Truce Designs.

More: Truce Designs - Cool Hunting

Boss.